Outcome: Children and youth respect diversity and demonstrate empathy and pro-social behaviors

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Indicator

% of students with disciplinary actions that resulted in removal from the classroom

 

Significance of this indicator: The single greatest predictor of future incarceration is a history of disciplinary referrals at school.  Negative behavior that results in a removal from the regular classroom is an early warning sign that should spur immediate action to understand the underlying reasons associated with the offense.  A clear understanding of root causes, guided by research-based assessments, presents a unique opportunity for all adults who are involved in a child’s life to:  1) understand what is contributing to the problem, and 2) correctly identify the positive/protective factors that will help motivate the child to change his/her behavior and regain confidence and belief in him/herself.

 

How we are doing on this indicator: The graph below reflects the percentage of students whose behavior resulted in a removal from their day-to-day school schedule, including:  ISS-In School Suspension, HSS-Home Suspension, DAEP-Disciplinary Alternative Education Program, and Expulsion. 

what the data tell us

 

 

Definition:  Percentage of youth with disciplinary offenses that resulted in a removal from the regular classroom

Data SourceDistrict Discipline Data Report, Texas Education Agency, 2007-2010

Data Considerations: Disciplinary outcomes are discretionary or mandatory based on federal and state law and/or policy.

 

The Story Behind the indicator

 

For AISD students, there is a downward trend of removals during the past three years.  Furthermore, when compared to neighboring districts with similar student demographics, AISD ranks better in terms of rates of removal to alternative settings. These data indicate not only a decrease in student behaviors leading to disciplinary actions that take a student out of his or her regular classroom, but also a decrease in time spent by administrators in addressing disciplinary infractions (e.g., holding removal conferences or expulsion hearings.)

 

Some local efforts to improve this indicator

 

  • The nationally acclaimed Positive Behavior Support Framework was first implemented in AISD in early 2000.  With significant additional funding from the ACCESS initiative in 2007, AISD has been able to expand the PBS initiative to 87 schools.  The PBS Austin model has been acclaimed throughout the country as a model of success at the local/city level. Research-based trainings include: the 25 Minute Planning Process, CAPTURE, Data Collection and Analysis and PBS at the Student Level.  Trainings that have addressed the disproportionate number of males, and particularly African American males include: “Strategies for working with Boys and Culturally Responsive PBS”.

 

  • AISD is looking to further improve campus systems and structures that will help all campus staff to systematically identify and intervene early with students that are struggling academically, experiencing conduct or behavioral problems and/or presenting emotional/ mental health concerns that are creating barriers for them to succeed in school.  Early intervention is critical.  Connecting students with the appropriate school or community support greatly increases the likelihood that they will succeed in school and graduate on time.

 

  • Communities In Schools’ mission is to provide support and leverage resources for students and their families so that students succeed in school and in life.  CIS provides a continuum of care through school-based services including case management, counseling, crisis intervention, linkage to health and human services, parental involvement, career exploration, mentoring, tutoring, and enrichment activities. CIS has programming on 57 school campuses in six school districts throughout Central Texas.

 

  • Three School-to-Community Liaisons (Master level Social Workers), funded under the ACCESS initiative, work with students who have been removed to an alternative school in an effort to prevent recidivism.  Preliminary data suggest that working with campus staff on interventions and behavior plans for students prior to a removal, and working with students and families during the transitions to and from the DAEP when a student is removed, decrease recidivism.

 

  • The Alternative Learning Center has instituted a new student data base that allows for improved communication of important student information between the ALC and the student’s home campus.  Important interventions that are begun at the ALC can now easily be communicated to the home campus counselor in order to continue care coordination for the student and family.

 

  • The Council on At Risk Youth’s (CARY) youth violence prevention program demonstrates significant improvements in attitude, behavior, social skills, problem solving skills, anger management skills, conflict resolution skills, school attendance rates, grades and decreases in disciplinary offenses and disciplinary actions.  Principals, assistant principals, counselors and parents give the CARY program high marks ranging from 90 to 100% concurrence in these positive changes.  CARY outcome data for students completing the program demonstrate a 78% decrease in serious behavioral incidents and a 51%  decrease in school disciplinary actions.  In addition,  64% of students demonstrate improvements in grades and 54% show improvements in attendance.

 

  • SafePlace provides school-based, psycho-educational support groups designed to decrease bullying and other abusive behaviors by implementing the Expect Respect curriculum. The program targets high risk students with the goal to decrease disciplinary placements, contribute to increased student safety, decrease victimization and decrease substance abuse. Program evaluation indicates that disciplinary referral rates for program participants dropped, particularly for substance abuse and aggressive offenses.  Given that SafePlace aims to affect boys’ abilities to communicate and decrease aggressive behavior, these data are very promising (ACCESS, End-of-Year Report, 2010).

 

  • With funding from St David's Foundation, Communities In Schools offered several trainings in early February, 2011 on working with students who have a history of trauma and difficulty managing their behavior in school.  Trauma Proofing Your School TM is designed to help school-based mental health providers, administrators, teachers and behavioral / learning support staff better understand the effects of trauma in children and young adolescents and strengthen their abilities to effectively and sensitively respond to these students.  Approximately 110 school-based staff from 42 Austin and Central Texas elementary and middle schools participated in the training.  Each of these participants also received a CD with a power point presentation that they can share with the faculty in their home schools. 


  • Recognition and credit must be given to the plethora of organizations, large and small, that provide opportunities for children and youth that make them feel connected and thrive in their own communities.  Partnerships between the school district and the community which bring rich and meaningful after school programs to children and their families are a critical component for keeping our youth engaged, healthy, and connected.  Commonly referred to as “protective factors”, these engaging activities that help youth to express themselves in a variety of ways and are a very important component of a healthy community. 

 

 

A Closer look at the story behind the indicators

 

Definition:  The total number of discretionary and mandatory DAEP placements.

Data SourceDistrict Discipline Data Report, Austin ISD, Texas Education Agency, 2007-2010

Data Considerations: Mandatory removals are offenses committed by a student that require that a student be removed to the DAEP.  Examples include: engaging in conduct punishable as a felony, committing assault with injury, selling or possessing a controlled substance, possessing a bb gun, air gun or a home made weapon, repeated gang related activity.

Discretionary removals give the campus administrators the option of removing the student to the ALC or keeping him or her enrolled in the home campus.  Examples include: serious misbehavior (offenses that pose physical danger to the student, others or property), persistent misbehavior (two or more violations of the student code of conduct in general or repeated occurrences of the same violation), physical aggression, and threatening behavior.

 

Above: Discretionary and Mandatory DAEP placements over the last 3 years. There was an increase in the number of Mandatory DAEP placements but a decrease in discretionary ones between the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school years.


 

Definition:  The total number of discretionary and mandatory DAEP placements, by race

Data SourceDistrict Discipline Data Report, Austin ISD, Texas Education Agency, 2009-2010

Data Considerations: In general, disciplinary rates continue to decrease across instructional levels, and disaggregated groups, but the disciplinary action rates of African American students continues to be disproportionate to other ethnic groups. The exact number of removals for the Asian, Native American and White ethnic groups cannot be reported due to FERPA regulations.

 

Above: Discretionary and Mandatory DAEP placements were higher among African American and Hispanic students.


 

Definition:  The total number of discretionary and mandatory DAEP placements, by sex

Data SourceDistrict Discipline Data Report, Austin ISD, Texas Education Agency, 2009-2010

Data Considerations:  Male students are removed at greater rates than female students.

 

Above: Discretionary and Mandatory DAEP placements were significantly higher among males than females.

 

Definition:  The top reasons for In-School Suspensions (ISS)

Data SourceDistrict Discipline Data Report, Austin ISD, Texas Education Agency, 2009-2010

Data Considerations: Violated COC is an abbreviation for “Violated Local Code of Conduct”; Fighting is defined as Mutual Combat. These data are broken down by unique student and by incident, demonstrating that there are a number of students with multiple offenses.

 

 

Above: The top reason for In-School Suspensions is Violation of the Local Code of Conduct.


 

Definition:  The top reasons for Home School Suspensions (HSS)

Data SourceDistrict Discipline Data Report, Austin ISD, Texas Education Agency, 2009-2010

Data Considerations: Violated COC is an abbreviation for “Violated Local Code of Conduct”; Fighting is defined as Mutual Combat. These data are broken down by unique student and by incident, demonstrating that there are a number of students with multiple offenses.

 

 

Above: The top reason for Home School Suspensions is Violated Local Code of Conduct.


 

Definition:  The top reasons for District Alternative Education Placement (DAEP)

Data SourceDistrict Discipline Data Report, Austin ISD, Texas Education Agency, 2009-2010

Data Considerations: Violated COC is an abbreviation for “Violated Local Code of Conduct”; Fighting is defined as Mutual Combat. These data are broken down by unique student and by incident, demonstrating that there are a number of students with multiple offenses.

 

Above: The top two reasons for District Alternative Education Placement are for Drugs and Violation of Local Code of Conduct.  A comprehensive and well-coordinated effort for prevention and early intervention for students with substance abuse problems presents a continuing opportunity for the Austin ISD to take action with the help of community partners.  Although community agencies, such as the Palmer Drug Abuse Program and Phoenix House have helped stem the rising need of students and families to reduce substance abuse, as well as the ALC’s INVEST program for 1st time offenders, more coordinated and comprehensive efforts are needed.

 


The following individuals/organizations contributed to the development of this indicator.

 

 

 
Workforce Solutions - Capital Area United Way Capital Area (UWCA) Community Action Network